Culinary Trails in Port Barre Louisiana

The abundance of fantastic food to be found throughout Louisiana can be a little overwhelming for some visitors, particularly if they haven’t sampled our fabulous indigenous cuisine before. How will you decide where to go and what to eat? To help you manage the choices, we suggest using Louisiana's Culinary Trails as guideposts. The Louisiana Office of Tourism and the makers of TABASCO® hot pepper sauce have laid out seven regional “trails” that traverse byways, prairies, marshlands and waterways that are great sources of some of the finest food you’ll ever enjoy. Discover some of the chefs and restaurants who are keeping the tradition of great food alive and thriving in Louisiana.

Port Barre, the site of a French trading post 250 years ago, sits right at the point where Bayou Courtableau flows into Bayou Teche.

In 1733, the semi-nomadic Opelousas Indians petitioned the French colonial government to send traders to their district. A couple of coureurs des bois, who had come to the area in search of trade opportunities, set up a trading post where the bayous meet.

In 1765, Jacques Courtableau, a wealthy landowner, gave land grants to 32 Acadian immigrants. That same year, he sold a large parcel of land including the site of the first trading post to Charles Barre. The post later became known as Barre’s Landing, then Port Barre.

Today, you can see where Bayou Teche begins and stay at the Bayou Teche RV Park, nestled on the bayou. You’ll also want to stop in at the local grocery to sample some of the best jalapeno, sausage & cheese bread you’ll ever taste.

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