Seven Don't Miss Louisiana Food Tours

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A selection of region-specific itineraries for food lovers on the go
By LouisianaTravel.com Staff
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Boudin Tasting on Cajun Food Tours in Lafayette
Taste Louisiana boudin, a type of rice and meat stuffed sausage, on one of the many stops on Cajun Food Tours outings in Lafayette. (c) Cajun Food Tours

Lafayette: Touring the Tastiest Town in the South

The unofficial capital of Louisiana’s Cajun heartland is also one of its most revered, thanks to the kinds of restaurants and roadside stands that made Southern Living name Lafayette the “Tastiest Town in the South.”

Cajun food rules in Lafayette, with mom and pop joints, high-end dining and just about everything in-between. With so many choices, you may have a tough time deciding where and what to eat — and that’s where Cajun Food Tours comes in. Company founder Marie Ducote-Comeaux takes visitors on three-hour tours of six locally owned restaurants. Pick from three different tour options including the original Cajun Food Tour. Hear stories about the history and culture of Acadiana (another name for Cajun Country) while eating gumbo, étouffée, cracklins, boudin and other Louisiana specialties.

Baton Rouge: Louisiana’s Culinary Capital

Louisiana’s capital city is home to an eclectic mix of cosmopolitan flavors and Cajun cooking, and Baton Rouge Food Tours invites you to sample all of them. Its two-and-a-half hour C’est Si Bon walking tasting tour takes visitors for a stroll through downtown Baton Rouge, viewing historical sites and fine architecture while discussing the culture of the town.

And of course, there are the restaurants! Taste po'boys, shrimp and grits, beigents — all of which give food lovers a sampling of what south Louisiana cuisine is all about. Baton Rouge Food Tours is the city’s No. 1 food and drink attraction on TripAdvisor

Avery Island: Visiting Hot Spots in TABASCO Country

If you’ve heard of Avery Island, it’s probably because of the famous pepper sauce known as TABASCO. It’s found on dinner tables not just in Louisiana, but around the world. No history book about Louisiana is complete without the story of TABASCO and the McIlhenny family that founded it.

On the TABASCO Food Tour, you’ll not only learn about the company but you’ll get to taste the dishes that pair so well with the hot sauce. Guides take visitors to six Cajun restaurants in New Iberia. The spots change, but frequent stops include Bon Creole Seafood and R&M’s Boiling Point. It’s the perfect way to follow up your factory tour or a trip to TABASCO’s Jungle Gardens.

New Orleans: The Birthplace of Creole Cuisine

New Orleans’ contribution to American cuisine cannot be overstated. Étouffée, beignets, po’boys and the muffuletta — the culinary world would be a poorer place without these foods that are synonymous with New Orleans cuisine.

Now, you could take your chances and find a fine restaurant on your own, or you could leave it to the experts to guide you through the fascinating history of New Orleans’ famous haunts and even more famous dishes. The experts at Destination Kitchen take guests on tasting tours of the French Quarter, the Garden District and Uptown.

Tastebud Tours offers visitors a chance to taste Creole dishes from French Quarter landmarks, as well as a special dessert-themed tour. New Orleans Culinary History Tours serves up its French Quarter tour along with a special drinks-centric excursion, plus a combo package that includes a cooking demonstration. If you are feeling more like a casual cruise through the city, take a bike ride tasting tour with Confederacy of Cruisers. These are more like "eating" tours as they head to spots that are cheap, make ridiculously delicious food, and are well off the average tourist beat.

Shreveport-Bossier City: North Louisiana’s Soul Food Connection

For a taste of Louisiana’s Southern hospitality, head north to the Shreveport-Bossier City area and get in touch with Chef Hardette Harris’ Pure Louisiana Soul Food Tastings & Tours.

Chef Harris takes visitors on four or five restaurants that cover a multitude of multicultural flavors. Greek, Italian and Cajun-Creole cuisine are on the itinerary, as are the dishes Chef Harris is best known for — what’s commonly called Southern or soul food. Her hot water cornbread and collard greens are outstanding, and with a little prompting, she’ll tell you how to make your own. We guarantee you’ll feel right at home digging into Chef Harris’ down-home cooking.