History & Heritage in Sulphur Louisiana

One facet of Louisiana that makes it such an appealing visitor destination is its deep and colorful history. European explorers found their way to the region and inhabited the area very early relative to settlement of much of the rest of the continent. As a result, some communities in Louisiana are among the oldest in the United States. Before those explorers arrived, of course, people we now know as Native Americans populated the region. Reaching still farther back in time, ancient peoples left their mark on the area thousands of years ago. The state of Louisiana offers many ways to explore the region’s rich history, in hundreds of museums, historic structures, landmarks, artifacts and works of art. The careful preservation and restoration of these sites and artifacts has created many rare opportunities for visitors to experience Louisiana’s history and gain insights into the diverse cultures that continue to influence the state today.

To the west of Lake Charles, Sulphur is a strong family-oriented community with a host of events occurring each year. If you happen to be driving through Sulphur near the beginning of December, you might see snowflakes during the Christmas Under the Oaks Festival located at the Brimstone Museum Complex including a holiday house, live music, Louisiana’s only balloon parade and carnival rides. The area is also home to one of the oldest fairs in the state, the Cal-Cam Fair, which celebrates the cultures of Calcasieu and Cameron Parishes each October. Sulphur is brimming with youth sports each summer, and you can literally hear cheering fans in the air while splashing in the outdoor water park. The city is known as the gateway to the Creole Nature Trail All-American Road with the Sabine National Wildlife Refuge just down the road a ways from the Henning Cultural Center, featuring rotating exhibits.

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