Culinary Trails in Slidell Louisiana

The abundance of fantastic food to be found throughout Louisiana can be a little overwhelming for some visitors, particularly if they haven’t sampled our fabulous indigenous cuisine before. How will you decide where to go and what to eat? To help you manage the choices, we suggest using Louisiana's Culinary Trails as guideposts. The Louisiana Office of Tourism and the makers of TABASCO® hot pepper sauce have laid out seven regional “trails” that traverse byways, prairies, marshlands and waterways that are great sources of some of the finest food you’ll ever enjoy. Discover some of the chefs and restaurants who are keeping the tradition of great food alive and thriving in Louisiana.

 

Slidell begins where Lake Pontchartrain ends, where the lake forges triumphantly towards the Gulf of Mexico via a deepwater strait. At the Rigolets pass, you’re as likely to encounter tooling sailboats as toiling shrimpboats. The hinterland is striped with bayous, where canoe travel is more appropriate. If you’re into waterborne recreation—whether fishing, sailing, canoeing or waterskiing—there’s no question you’ll be into Slidell. But this is no remote getaway. Slidell stands just across the water from New Orleans, 20 minutes away. Culturally—and culinarily—there is little distinction between the two. Slidell is proud of its historic Olde Towne, with its excellent restaurants, antique shops and an ambience that recalls simpler times. On the other hand, Slidell also contains a top-notch regional shopping mall, North Shore Square. And Slidell may be one of the easiest places to access in Louisiana, at the junction of interstates 10, 12 and 59.