History & Heritage in Mandeville Louisiana

One facet of Louisiana that makes it such an appealing visitor destination is its deep and colorful history. European explorers found their way to the region and inhabited the area very early relative to settlement of much of the rest of the continent. As a result, some communities in Louisiana are among the oldest in the United States. Before those explorers arrived, of course, people we now know as Native Americans populated the region. Reaching still farther back in time, ancient peoples left their mark on the area thousands of years ago. The state of Louisiana offers many ways to explore the region’s rich history, in hundreds of museums, historic structures, landmarks, artifacts and works of art. The careful preservation and restoration of these sites and artifacts has created many rare opportunities for visitors to experience Louisiana’s history and gain insights into the diverse cultures that continue to influence the state today.

Mandeville is where the urban meets the natural. Founded in 1834 by the Marigny de Mandeville family of New Orleans, it developed early on as a lakeside summer resort for wealthy denizens of the Crescent City. This remains in evidence in the older quarters of the city, and in some of its key historic properties that are found on Lakeshore Drive. In the 1950s, Mandeville was connected to the south shore of Lake Pontchartrain via the Causeway, the longest bridge in the world.  To complement its well-established, wooded suburbs, Mandeville offers a full complement of upscale amenities. These include fine dining establishments, shops and day spas – the perfect for unwinding after a visit to New Orleans. At the edge of town, Fontainebleau State Park offers cabins and campsites with plenty of diversion for nature lovers. It also connects to the Tammany Trace, a leafy, 31-mile trail that bicyclers find exhilarating.

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