By LouisianaTravel.com Staff

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Tickfaw State Park Canoeing
Enjoy a serene paddle on your visit to Tickfaw State Park.

Tickfaw, a Native American name meaning “Rest Among the Pines,” is a fitting name for this state park. Located in Livingston Parish, Tickfaw State Park offers visitors plenty of places to rest, among pines, in a canoe cruising the lazy Tickfaw River or in one of the scenic cabins or campsites.

The park shows its different personalities during each season. Spring brings occasional flooding from the Tickfaw River that nourishes native plants and provides breeding grounds for its wildlife. The dense tree canopies, water playground and cool river offer respite during hot summer months, and the fall and winter months offer more solitude and reasons to keep warm by the barbecue grill.

Start your trip at Tickfaw State Park’s nature center, which hosts programs about the park’s ecology and biodiversity. Check out the 800-gallon aquarium that holds native fishes found in the Tickfaw River. And before hitting the trails, take a few minutes to watch the park’s introductory video — it’s a great way to enhance your park experience.

Boating is big on the Tickfaw. Boat and canoe launches are conveniently located within the park, and fishing for largemouth bass is a popular pastime. Canoeists are always looking out for alligators and turtles, hidden beneath canopies of trees offering plenty of shade (boats are available for rent at the park). The hiking trails here are phenomenal and include over a mile of boardwalks overlooking the cypress-tupelo swamp.

Camping options include tent and RV sites, deluxe cabins*, and a group camp that fits up to 52 guests. Accommodations are spread throughout the park, so wherever you choose to rest, you’ll have plenty of room to roam.

Tickfaw State Park is located about halfway between Baton Rouge, New Orleans and the Northshore town of Covington. Despite the park’s remote locale, it’s easy to reach all three cities within an hours’ drive. Besides the attractions of those cities, there are other natural areas that include Fairview-Riverside State Park, BREC Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center in Baton Rouge and the Global Wildlife Park in Folsom.

Entrance fee: $3 per person; free for seniors age 62 and older, and children age 3 and younger.

*Note: The cabins are currently closed, please check the website for future availability.

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